A few scanning tips

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Pagis Pro Search Tool

To search to find documents, you must build and update the Pagis index(s). This involves elaborate processing, and can take a while. You can do it in background, or if doing your entire disk, you may want it to run overnight (Pagis provides a scheduler to help). Indexes must be on writeable disks, so if cataloging a CDROM, the index must be on your harddisk (but Pagis keeps up with the volume name and serial number).

This is the SEARCH menu. You can add text words (titles and keywords) to the Pagis index for each image file (either when you scan or later) allowing searches on those words. The search is not limited to your scanned image files, it can search all files and documents on your system, like for example MS Word documents. But for files that otherwise do not contain words (your images), you can associate words to them.



This search screen is much like the Win95 FIND box, but has some Pagis enhancements. Instead of being the simplest possible search, there is much control. It can find misspelled words. There are optional operators, AND, OR, NEAR (can specify how near together key words should be, within 5 words, 1000 words), LIKE (similar words or sentences), word must be in same sentence, must be in same paragraph, words sound alike (sweet, suite), match case, match exact word, * and ? wildcards, etc. Unusual technology here, a very elegant search.

Here is one of the Pagis Pro Help pages.


Search Hints Button

You can search for words or phrases in your databases. Any words you supply in the Containing field are automatically "stemmed". That is, when you search for a word, any document containing a variation of those words will also be in the search result. For example, if you search for the word "scan", the search result would find documents with "scan", "scans", "scanned", " scanning", and so on.

Additionally, you can limit or expand your search with search "operators". Some of the familiar operators are "and", "or", "not", "near", "sentence", and "paragraph". You can also use the asterisk (*) and question mark (?) as " wild-card" operators.

See the table below for more information about these search operators.

And - This operator finds all documents that contain all of the words or phrases entered.

Example 1: laugh and play - the search result will include only documents that contain all of the words (laugh, play as all variations of these words). The found words can be in any order in the document.

Example 2: "laugh and play" - the search result will include documents that contain the exact phrase contained in quotes. In this case the word 'and' is not used as an operator but one of the words searched for.

Or - This operator finds all documents that contain one of the terms entered.

Example 1: cat or dog - the search result will include documents that contain either "cat" or "dog", and those that contain both "cat" and "dog", in any order.

Example 2 "laugh or play" - the search result will include documents that contain the exact phrase contained in quotes. In this case the word 'or' is not an operator but one of the words searched for

Not - This operator is used to exclude words or phrases in the search.

Example: laugh not play - the search result will include only documents that have the word "laugh" and that do not have the word "play".

Near/n - This operator is used to find two or more words or phrases within 1,000 words of each other.

Example: laugh "near" play - the search result will include documents with both of the words "laugh" and "play" within 1,000 words apart. In this case, the Relevance column on the Search Results window will be important to check. The closer the two words are, the greater the relevancy will be.To make this operator more powerful and more specific, you can specify the proximity by including "/n", where n is any number.

Example: laugh near/5 play - the search result will include documents with the words "laugh" and "play" within five words of each other.

Sentence - This operator is used to find two or more words or phrases within the same sentence.

Example: laugh sentence play - the search result will include documents with both "laugh" and "play" within the same sentence.

Paragraph -This operator is used to find two or more words or phrases within the same paragraph.

Example: laugh paragraph play - the search result will include documents with both "laugh" and "play" within the same paragraph.

Like - This operator is used to find similar words and expressions. This operator should be outside the text to be searched for, which is surrounded by quotes and parentheses.

Example: like ("skiing on icy trails can be dangerous") - the search result will include documents with expressions the same as, or similar in meaning to those quoted, such as "It can be very hazardous for a beginner to ski on steep, icy trails."

* -The asterisk is used to find any number of non-specific characters in a particular area of a word. You can use multiples of this operator within the same search.

Example: pag* - the search result will include documents with the words "page", "paged", "pagination", "Pagis", and so on.

Example: *pag* - the search result will include documents with the words "spaghetti", "page", "pageantry", "pagination", and "Pagis".

? - The question mark is used to find one non-specific character in a particular area of a word (beginning, middle, or end of the word, depending on where it is placed). You can use multiples of this operator within the same search.

Example: pag? - the search result will include documents with the word "page".

Example: pag?? - the search result will include documents with the word "page", "paged", "pager", "pages", and "Pagis".

 


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